Tag Archives: cache size

Autoptimize cache size: the canary in the coal mine

Update 23/06/2017: if you came here looking for solutions to Autoptimize cache-size problems after having (been) updated to AO 2.1.1; there’s a bug in that specific version, please update to either 2.1.2 or to the most recent stable version (currently 2.2.1).


another-canary-in-a-coal-mine
Copy/ pasted straight from a support question on wordpress.org;

Auto-deleting the cache would only solve one problem you’re having (disk space), but there are 2 other problems -which I consider more important- that auto-cleaning can never solve:
1. you will be generating new autoptimized JS very regularly, which slows your site down for users who happen to be the unlucky ones requesting that page
2. a visitor going from page X to page Y will very likely have to request a different autoptimized JS file for page Y instead of using the one from page X from cache, again slowing your site down

So I actually consider the cache-size warning like a canary in the coal mines; if the canary dies, you know there’s a bigger problem.

You don’t (or shouldn’t) really want me to take away the canary! :)

How to keep Autoptimize’s cache size under control (and improve visitor experience)

Update 2016: since AO 2.0, inline JS is not aggregated by default any more, which should prevent cache-size problems from occurring. Easiest solution for cache size issues is to make sure “aggregate inline JS” (and CSS) option is disabled. Below HowTo remains relevant in case you decide to enable the aggregation of inline code.


Confession time: Autoptimize does not have its proper cache purging mechanism. There are some good reasons for that (see below) but in most cases this is not something to worry about.

Except when it is something to worry about off course. Because in some cases the amount of cache-files generated by Autoptimize can grow to several Gigabytes. Why, you might wonder? Well, for each page being loaded Autoptimize aggregates all JS (and CSS) calculates the hash of that string and checks if an optimized version is in cache using that hash. If there is a difference (even if just a comma), the hash is not the same and the aggregated CSS/ JS is cached seperately. This behavior typically is caused by plugins that generate javascript-variables (or CSS-selectors) that are specific for each page (or even worse, for each page request). That does not only lead to a huge amount of files in the cache, but also impacts visitors as their browsers will have to request a different optimized CSS- or JS-file for each page instead of reusing the same file for several pages.

This is what you can do if you want a healthier cache both from a server- and visitor-perspective (based on JavaScript, but the same principle applies to CSS);

  1. Open two similar pages (posts).
  2. View source of the optimized JavaScript in those two pages.
  3. Copy the source of each to a seperate file and replace all semi-colons (“;”) with semi-colon+linefeed (“;\n”) in both files.
  4. Execute an automatic comparison between the two using e.g. diff (or “compare” in Notepad++), this should give you one or more lines that will probably be almost the same, but not exactly (e.g. with a different nonce or a postid in them).
  5. Now disable JS optimization and look for similar strings in the inline and the external JavaScript.
  6. If you find it in the inline JavaScript, try to identify a unique string in there (the name of a specific variable, probably) and write that down. If the variable JS is in a file, jot down the filename.
  7. Go to the autoptimize settings page and make sure the advanced settings are shown.
  8. Now add the strings or filenames from (6) to “Exclude scripts from Autoptimize:” (which is a comma-seperated list).
  9. Re-enable JS optimization.
  10. Save settings & clear cache.

This does require some digging, but the advantages are clear; a (much) smaller cache-size on disk and better performance for your visitors. Everyone will be so happy, people will want to hug you and there will be much rejoicing, generally.

So why doesn’t Autoptimize have automatic cache pruning? Well, the problem is a page caching layer (which could be a browser, a caching reverse proxy or a wordpress page caching plugin) contains pages that refer to the aggregated JS/CSS-files. If those optimized files were to be automatically removed while the page would remain in the page caching layer, people would get the cached page without any JS- or CSS-files being available. And as I don’t want Autoptimize to break your pages, I didn’t include a automatic cache purging mechanism. But if you have a bright idea of how this problem could be tackled, I’d be happy to reconsider, off course!