Tag Archives: release

Autoptimize 2.1 and first Power-Up released

Yesterday evening I released Autoptimize 2.1 and the first Power-Up to manage critical CSS has been made available as a optional service over at criticalcss.com. This short video explains some of the logic behind the Autoptimize Critical CSS Power-Up:

How to fix render-blocking CSS in WordPress

Watch this video on YouTube.

But let’s not forget about Autoptimize 2.1! The new features include:

  • Autoptimize now appears in the admin-toolbar with an easy view on cache size and the possibility to purge the cache (thanks to Pablo Custo)
  • A “More Optimization”-tab is shown with info about optimization tools- and services.
  • settings-screen now accepts protocol-relative URL for CDN base URL
  • admin GUI updated and responsiveness added
  • If cache size becomes too big, a mail will be sent to the site admin
  • power-users can enable Autoptimize to pre-gzip the autoptimized files with a filter
  • new (smarter) defaults for JS and CSS optimization

Although excluding jQuery from autoptimization by default might seem counter-intuitive, the “smarter” defaults should allow more Autoptimize installs to work out-of-the-box (including on sites run by people who might not be inclined to troubleshoot/ reconfigure Autoptimize in the first place).

And thanks to the release I now have a better idea of the number of active installs (which wordpress.org lists as +100000); 2.1 was downloaded 3239 times yesterday evening and it is listed as running on 1.8% sites. Simple math learns that Autoptimize is currently active on approx. 180000 WordPress websites. Let’s aim for 200K by the end of 2016! :-)

Making Autoptimize faster

One of the big changes in Autoptimize 2.0 (estimated released between Christmas & New Year) is a significant improvement in the minification speed (30% faster should be no exception). As a quick reminder, this is what Autoptimize did until now;

  1. extract code from HTML & remove original references
  2. aggregate all code into one string
  3. check if a minified version of that string exists in cache
  4. if not in cache;
    1. minify that string
    2. store the result in cache
  5. inject reference to cached autoptimized code in HTML

It is the actual minification in step (4) which can slow Autoptimize down (hence the importance of making sure your cached files are reusable). In Autoptimize 2.0 above logic was changed to improve performance;

  1. extract code from HTML & remove original references
  2. aggregate all unminified code into one string, but only put a reference to already minified files (*min.css and *min.js)
  3. check if a minified version of that string exists in cache
  4. if not in cache;
    1. minify that string
    2. replace references to minified files with (slightly optimized) contents
    3. store the result in cache
  5. inject reference to cached autoptimized code in HTML

As the to-be-minified string is smaller, the JS- & CSS-minifiers have less code to optimize, indeed speeding up the process significantly. Additionally this also reduces the chances of problems with the re-minification of already minified code (e.g. p. So nothing but advantages, right?

Now this was tested rather thoroughly and all known kinks have been ironed out, but If this “injected minified code late”-approach does not work in your context, you can simply disable it by hooking into the API and setting the autoptimize_filter_js_inject_min_late and/ or autoptimize_filter_css_inject_min_late filters to false (use code snippets rather then adding it to your functions.php);

add_filter('autoptimize_filter_js_inject_min_late','no_late_inject');
add_filter('autoptimize_filter_css_inject_min_late','no_late_inject');
function no_late_inject() {
	return false;
}

Celebrating 300000 Autoptimize downloads with new release

300k-1, that isSo just now Autoptimize passed the 300000 downloads mark (6 months after reaching 200k), which feels huge to me. To celebrate I just pushed out version 1.9.3, which features -as becomes a minor release- small improvements and bugfixes. From the changelog;

  • improvement: more intelligent CDN-replacement logic, thanks Squazz for reporting and testing
  • improvement: allow strings (comments) to be excluded from HTML-optimization when comment removal is active (via API)
  • improvement: changed priority with which AO gets triggered by WordPress, solving JS not being aggregated when NextGen Galleries is active, with great help from msebald
  • improvement: extra JS exclude-strings: gist.github.com, text/html, text/template, wp-slimstat.min.js, _stq, nonce, post_id (the latter two were removed from the default “manual” exclude list on the settings-page and can be removed there if you want)
  • new in API: autoptimize_filter_html_exclude, autoptimize_filter_css_defer, autoptimize_filter_css_inline, autoptimize_filter_base_replace_cdn, autoptimize_filter_js_noptimize, autoptimize_filter_css_noptimize, autoptimize_filter_html_noptimize
  • bugfix: remove some PHP notices, as reported by dimitrov.adrian
  • bugfix: make sure HTML-optimalization does not gobble a space before a cite as proposed by ecdltf
  • bugfix: cleaning the cache did not work on non-default directories as encountered by NoahJ Champion
  • upgraded to yui compressor php port 2.4.8-4
  • added arabic translation, thanks to the ekleel team
  • tested with WordPress 4.2 beta 3 (yep, it works)

So there you have your present, no go unwrap it! Have fun! :-)

Autoptimize minor update and beyond

I just released an update to Autoptimize, bumping the version to 1.9.2. Main new features;

  • New: support for alternative cache-directory and file-prefix as requested by a.o. Jassi Bacha, Cluster666 and Baris Unver.
  • Improvement: hard-exclude all linked-data json objects (script type=application/ld+json)
  • Improvement: several filters added to the API, e.g. to alter optimized HTML, CSS or JS
  • Some bugfixes
  • Swedish translations updated & Ukrainian added, courtesy of Zanatoly of SebWeo.com

I’m already thinking about version 2.0 (which should fix the 2 big issues some people face; exploding cache size due to page-specific inline code & the rare but nasty white screen of death due to CSS minification issues) and about some powerful new features that could extend Autoptimize for professionals and power-users in need of something more. 2015 is going to be great, hope you guys & girls will be part of that!

Anyway, enjoy the end-of-year festivities and above all, have fun & share some of the happiness!

 

Power users rejoice; WP YouTube Lyte has an API

Power users of WP YouTube Lyte might be particularly interested in the version that is being pushed out as we speak. 1.3.0 comes with an API, allowing you to substantially change the way the plugin works.

You have the following filters to play around with;

  • lyte_settings; filter to change values in the settingsArray without changing the actual setting
  • lyte_content_preparse; filter to change the_content before the httpv-links are being parsed
  • lyte_match_preparse_fragment; filter to change an individual httpv-link before it is parsed
  • lyte_match_postparse_template; filter to change the parsed code before it is merged back in the_content
  • lyte_content_postparse; filter to parse the_content before it is being handed over to the next plugin
  • lyte_css; filter to change WP YouTube Lyte’s CSS
  • lyte_actionsfilters; action to add extra actions or filters, e.g. to make sure widget_text is parsed by lyte_parse as well

The plugin now comes with “lyte_helper.php_example” which is an sample plugin file that, when copied to “/wp-content/plugins/lyte_helper.php” can be activated as a separate plugin and which contains examples of how the API can be used.

For the less tech-savvy users, these are some of the other changes in 1.3.0 (from the changelog):

  • Support for higher quality thumbnails by adding #hqThumb=1 to httpv-link
  • You can disable microdata on a per-video level by adding #noMicrodata=1 to the httpv-link when microdata is enabled.
  • Checkbox on admin-page to flush WP YouTube Lyte cache (which holds title, description, … from YouTube)

As always; feedback, bug reports, feature requests, criticism or code suggestions are more then welcome in the comments or via the contact form.

But whatever you do, make sure to have fun while doing it! This embedded YouTube audio track (a 2h BBC essential mix by Flying Lotus from back in 2008) might help, if you’re into that type of music that is;

Flying Lotus Essential Mix – All 2 Hours – 2008-11-29 High Quality

Watch this video on YouTube.

Fiesta: WP YouTube Lyte reaches 1.0.0

I just released the one dot ohhhh dot ohhhhhhhhhh version of WP YouTube Lyte!

From the changelog:

  • new: also works on (manual) excerpts; just add a httpv link to the “excerpt” field on the post/page admin (based on feedback from Ruben@tuttingegneri)
  • new: if youtube-url contains “start” or “showinfo” parameters, these are used when playing the actual video. This means that you can now jump to a specific time in the YouTube video or stop the title/ author from being displayed (based on feedback from a.o. Miguel and Josh D)
  • update: javascript now initiates either after full page load or after 1 second (whatever comes first), thus avoiding video not showing due to other requests taking too long
  • update: bonus feature stops lockerz.com tracking by addtoany (you’ll still want to hide the “earn pointz” tab though)
  • bugfix: prevent the playing video to be in front of e.g. a dropdown-menu or lightbox (thanks to Matt Whittingham)
  • bugfix: solve overlap between player and text when option was set not to show links (reported by Josh D)

And an appropriate vid to go with this new release:

The Pogues – Fiesta [Music Video]

Watch this video on YouTube.