Tag Archives: gutenberg

How to (not) correctly load Gutenberg JS

On Facebook someone asked me how to do Gutenberg the right way to avoid loading too much JS on the frontend, this is a somewhat better organized version of my answer;

I’m not a Gutenberg specialist (for from it, really) but:

  • the wrong way is adding JS with wp-block/ wp-element and other gutenberg dependencies on init calling wp_enqueue_script,
  • the right way is either hooking into enqueue_block_editor_assets (see https://jasonyingling.me/enqueueing-scripts-and-styles-for-gutenberg-blocks/)
  • or when using init doing wp_register_script and then register_block_type referring to the correct editor_script previously registered (see https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/handbook/designers-developers/developers/tutorials/block-tutorial/writing-your-first-block-type/).

I’ve tried both of these on a “bad” plugin and can confirm both solutions do prevent those needless wp-includes/js/dist/* JS-files from being added on the front-end.

Developers: don’t make Gutenberg go Badass-enberg on my frontend!

Over the past couple of months, since the release of WordPress 5.0 which includes Gutenberg, the new JavaScript-based block editor, I have seen many sites loading a significant amount of extra JavaScript from wp-includes/js/dist on the frontend due to plugins doing it wrong.

So dear plugin-developer-friends; when adding Gutenberg blocks please differentiate between editor access and visitor access, only enqueue JS/ CSS if needed to display your blocks and when registering for front-end please please frigging please don’t declare wp-blocks, wp-element, … and all of those other editor goodies as dependencies unless your 100% sure this is needed (which will almost never be the case).

The performance optimization crowd will thank you for being considerate and -more likely- will curse you if you are not!

(When) Should you update to WordPress 5.0?

Concerning the very short-notice release-announcement of WordPress 5.0 with Gutenberg for Dec 6th: I’m with Yoast;He has a great “should I update”-checklist and conclusion in this blogpost;

  • Is now the right time to update?
  • Can your site work with Gutenberg?
  • Do you need it?

So our advice boils down to: if you can wait, wait. 

So if you have a busy end-of-year, if you’re not 100% sure your site will work with Gutenburg or if you don’t really need Gutenberg in the first place; wait (while WordPress 5.0 stabilizes with some minor releases).

Long overdue: WP YouTube Lyte update

It took me way too long (Autoptimize and related stuff is great fun, but it is eating a lot of time), but I just pushed out an update to my first ever plugin; WP YouTube Lyte. From the changelog:

So there you have it; Lite YouTube Embeds 2018 style and an example Lyte embed of a 1930’s style Blue Monday …

Orkestra Obsolete play Blue Monday using 1930s instruments – BBC Arts

Watch this video on YouTube.

How to extract blocks from Gutenberg

So Gutenberg, the future of WordPress content editing, allows users to create, add and re-use blocks in posts and pages in a nice UI. These blocks are added in WordPress’ the_content inside HTML-comments to ensure backwards-compatibility. For WP YouTube Lyte I needed to extract information to be able to replace Gutenberg embedded YouTube with Lytes and I took the regex-approach. Ugly but efficient, no?

But what if you need a more failsafe method to extract Gutenberg block-data from a post? I took a hard look at the Gutenberg code and came up with this little proof-of-concept to extract all data in a nice little (or big) array:

add_action('the_content','gutenprint',10,1);
function gutenprint($html) {
  	// check if we need to and can load the Gutenberg PEG parser
  	if ( !class_exists("Gutenberg_PEG_Parser") && file_exists(WP_PLUGIN_DIR."/gutenberg/lib/load.php") ) {
  		include_once(WP_PLUGIN_DIR."/gutenberg/lib/load.php");
	}

  	if ( class_exists("Gutenberg_PEG_Parser") && is_single() ) {
	  // do the actual parsing
	  $parser = new Gutenberg_PEG_Parser;
	  $result = $parser->parse(  _gutenberg_utf8_split( $html ) );
	  
	  // we need to see the HTML, not have it rendered, so applying htmlentities
  	  array_walk_recursive($result,
		function (&$result) { $result = htmlentities($result); }
		);

	  // and dump the array to the screen
	  echo "<h1>Gutenprinter reads:</h1><pre>";
	  var_dump($result);
	  echo "</pre>";
	} else {
	  echo "Not able to load Gutenberg parser, are you sure you have Gutenberg installed?";
	}
  
  	// remove filter to avoid double output
  	remove_filter('the_content','gutenprint');
  
  	// and return the HTML
	return $html;
}

I’m not going to use it for WP YouTube Lyte as I consider the overhead not worth it (for now), but who know it could be useful for others?

Of bugs, inconsistencies and tag soup in (future) core

In general i rarely bother looking into WordPress core code or what’s on the horizon. The last month or so however I came across 3 problems that were due to core.

1. Shortly after pushing Autoptimize 2.3.x out, a subset of users started complaining about a flood of “cachebuster”-requests bringing their site to a crawl. It turned out all of them were using Redis or Memcached and that due to a longstanding bug in WordPress core Autoptimize did not get the correct version-string from the database, triggering the update-procedure over and over, purging and then preloading the cache. A workaround -involving a transient featuring my wife and daughter- was introduced to prevent this, but “oh my gawd” what an ugly old WordPress core bug that is! Can someone please get this fixed?

2. A couple of users of WP YouTube Lyte noticed their browsers complaining about unbalanced tags in the Lyte HTML output (which is part of the_content). It took me a lot of time to come to the conclusion that WordPress core’s wpautop was messing things up severely due to the noscript and meta-tags in Lyte’s output. As wpautop has no filters or actions to alter the way it works, I ended up disabling wpautop when lyte’s were found in the_content.

3. My last encounter was with the ghost of WordPress Yet-to-come; Gutenberg … To allow WP YouTube Lyte to turn Gutenberg embedded YouTube’s into Lyte’s, it turned out I had to dive into the tag soup that Gutenberg adds as HTML-comments to the_content. I have yet to find documented functions to extract the information the smart way, so regexes to the rescue. But any plugin that hooks into the_content better be aware that Gutenberg (as part of WordPress 5.0) will potentially mess things up severely.

Although I cursed and sighed and I am now complaining, I felt great relief when having fixed/ worked around these issues. But working in the context of a large and successful open source software project and depending on it’s quality can sometimes almost be a pain as much as it is a joy. Almost … ;-)